Archives For Bible

This coming Sunday I am preaching on Philippians 2:19-30. The passage includes three characters: Paul, Timothy, and Epaphroditus. These three characters are all unique in their own way and each serve God in their own way. Each of them have received unique gifts and developed their talents for His glory and for His service. This passage gives a great opportunity to talk about the unity of the body of Christ and the usefulness of each member of that body utilizing their God-given spiritual gifts for His service and in His church.

To illustrate this point here is a personality profile chart for the Myers-Briggs Personality Profile test as it relates to Biblical characters.

I have done this test a couple of times and my personality was mostly ESFJ and some ENTJ. Mostly David and some of Paul.

If you would like you can take one of those personality profiles here:JUNG Personality Test

Who Are You?

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Catch up on what you missed from the past two Sunday’s Philippians Series. Next Sunday’s message will continue on through Philippians 1:12-18.

Sermon #1: Phil. 1:1-3

Sermon #2: Phil 1:3-11

I have been studying how to listen well for a Pastoral Counseling course at Liberty Seminary. This quote about congregational listening struck me as encouraging. For us preachers, kinds words and supportive comments during or after the sermon are extremely encouraging.

“Once at at preaching conference, I heard a nationally recognized African-American preacher discussing the “amens” and other vocal responses of his congregation during his sermons. Many of us were not used to such an interactive style.

He said,

“It isn’t just up to preachers [talkers] to get the message across. We need help. Preaching takes a lot of work from the congregation [the listeners] too. After services sometimes my people say, ‘We did good this morning!’ Now that’s real preaching when they feel like we did it together.”

Kollar, C.A., (2011) Solution-Focused Pastoral Counseling An Affective Short-Term Approach for Getting People Back on Track. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.53

Perception versus reality is often a difficult battle for a Christian. For this world is not my home, I’m just passing through. Paul speaks of this in 2 Corinthians 6 where he talks of persecution versus the reality of situation.

We are treated

as impostors, and yet are true;

as unknown, and yet well known;

as dying, and behold, we live;

as punished, and yet not killed;

as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing;

as poor, yet making many rich;

as having nothing, yet possessing everything.

2 Corinthians 6:8b-10

We are treated as impostors in this world, and yet we have the truth. Help them to know the truth, and the truth will set them free. As Paul says later on in the chapter, “widen your hearts” that we who are poor can make others rich.

Speaking of false religions and their pursuit of deity and more specifically the Ancient Near Eastern version of religion surrounding and excluding the nation of Israel:

“The divine, in its multiple, personalized presentations, was above all considered to be something grandiose, inaccessible, dominating, and to be feared.” He observes that the gods were not the object of enthusiastic pursuit. The people sought the gods for protection and assistance, not for relationship. “One submitted to them, one feared them, one bowed down and trembled before them: one did not ‘love’ or ‘like’ them.”

John H. Walton. Ancient near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament: Introducing the Conceptual World of the Hebrew Bible.

The Fear of God vs the fear of gods

I am excited about preaching at HFC again this Sunday (4/26/15). Here are a few of the themes we will cover on Sunday morning’s message.

2 Samuel 9

Quoted from David: A Man of Passion and Destiny by Charles Swindoll

8 Analogies of Grace

1. Once Mephibosheth had enjoyed fellowship with his father, and so had humanity in the Garden of Eden.

2. When disaster struck, fear came, and Mephibosheth suffered a fall that crippled him for the rest of his life. Similarly, when sin came, humanity suffered a fall, which has forever left us spiritually crippled.

3. Out of unconditioonal love for his friend Jonathan, David sought anyone to whom he might extend his grace. God, because of His unconditional love for His Son and acceptance of His Son’s death on the cross, continues to seek anyone to whom He might extend His grace.

4. The crippled man was destitute and undeserving. All he could do was accept the king’s favor. So, also, we sinners are undeserving and without hope. In no way are we worthy of our King’s favor. All we can do is humbly and gratefully accept it.

5. The king took the crippled Mephibosheth from a barren wasteland and seated him at the royal banquet table in the palace. God, our Father, has rescued us from a moral wasteland and seated us in a place of spiritual nourishment and intimacy.

6. David adopted Mephibosheth into his royal family, providing him with every blessing within the palace. We also have been adopted into a family–God’s family. And He gives us full privileges within His household.

7. Mephibosheth’s limp was a constant reminder of David’s grace. So also, our moral feebleness keeps us from ever forgetting that were sin abounds, grace abounds that much more.

8. When Mephibosheth sat at the king’s table, he was treated with the same respect as David’s own sons. When we one day attend the great wedding feast of the Lamb, the same will be true for us. We will sit with prophets and priests, apostles and evangelists, pastors and missionaries. We will dine with everyone from the apostle Peter to Corrie ten Boom. And we will be there with them because that same tablecloth of grace covers all our feet.

I am learning a lot about Christian liberty lately from my study in I Corinthians. I have complied a few thoughts, verses, and lyrics that have got me thinking over the past few weeks. Hope they will get you thinking as well.

Matthew Henry’s Commentary speaking of I Corinthians 10:23-33

Note: The welfare of others, as well as our own convenience, must be consulted in many things we do, if we would do them well.


II. He tells them that what was sold in the shambles they might eat without asking questions. The priest’s share of heathen sacrifices was thus frequently offered for sale, after it had been offered in the temple. Now the apostle tells them they need not be so scrupulous as to ask the butcher in the market whether the meat he sold had been offered to an idol? It was there sold as common food, and as such might be bought and used; for the earth is the Lord’s, and the fulness thereof (v. 26), and the fruit and products of the earth were designed by him, the great proprietor, for the use and subsistence of mankind, and more especially of his own children and servants. Every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving; for it is sanctified by the word of God and prayer, 1 Tim. 4:4, 5. To the pure all things are pure, Tit. 1:15. Note, Though it is sinful to use any food in an idolatrous manner, it is no sin, after such abuse, to apply it, in a holy manner, to its common use.

Henry, M. (1994). Matthew Henry’s commentary on the whole Bible: complete and unabridged in one volume (p. 2263). Peabody: Hendrickson.

I Cor. 10:19,20 — “What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything or that an idol is anything? No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God.”

 

 

I discovered the Podcast app on my phone and for me it was like finding the Fountain of Youth. I work outside landscaping for much of the summer months and as a result I spend many hours doing mindless tasks. Mowing, multching, and raking are a few of my favorite things… NOT!  But I have found a mindless job can go by much quicker when your mind isn’t mindless. Just because you are giving your body a workout doesn’t mean your mind can’t get one either. Podcasts are my cognitive and spiritual workout throughout the day. (Time flies when you are having a spiritual workout… is that how it goes?)

My latest listen has been on a past message from Josh Harris at T4G 2010. He spoke on the topics found in his book Dug Down Deep.  I have read the book and I thoroughly enjoy his premise and purpose for writing it. But to hear the message of the book in his own words through the method of a powerful sermon was something else entirely. I enjoyed this and I hope you will too.

His main thrust is to take seriously your responsibility to teach others how to properly build their lives on good Christ-centered doctrine so when the winds and waves come their house will stand. He also takes a deeper look at the story of the Two Builders. It is much more than just a simple dichotomy between saved=rock and unsaved=sand.

Click link to listen to the podcast:

Dug Down Deep: Helping Others Build Their Lives on Christ-Centered Doctrine

Ephesians

The book of Ephesians can be divided into two halves.

1.Theology (Chapters 1:3–3:21)

2.Ethics (Chapters 4:1–6:24)

In the first section of Ephesians the theology of God’s plan and our response to that plan is laid out for believers. We learn about God’s spiritual blessing upon our new lives found in Christ. God is ultimately the instigator of salvation and we find our lives fully changed by the Son’s sacrifice on the cross. I found this interesting Bible Study Exercise from the Teacher’s Commentary that helps draw out our immense inheritance through our new found life in Christ because of what the Father has done. I don’t know about you but I am always looking for more interactive studies to use for messages and to help my students better understand the Bible. This study is simple but can be extremely helpful. Hope you find it of some use.

Link to Life Bible Study

Divide into pairs. Give each member a NEW IDENTITY chart. Each pair is to find in Ephesians 1 and 2 evidence of what God has done, and of what we now have and are in Christ. When the passages have been studied, each should individually write out which of the findings seem most significant to him or her and why.

 

My New Identity

Portrayed in Ephesians 1 and 2
 
What God has done
 
What we now have
 
1:5
 
1:6
 
1:8
 
1:7
 
1:13
 
1:7
 
1:13
 
1:9
 
2:5
 
1:13
 
2:6
 
1:18
 
2:8
 
1:19
 
2:13
 
1:23
 
2:19
 
1:23
 
2:22
 
2:4
 
 
 
2:5
 
 
 
2:13, 18
 
 
 
2:14
 
 
 
2:16
 
 
 
2:19
 
 
 
2:20
 
 
 
2:22

Teen Stunt Man Videos

jordantmoody —  November 25, 2013 — Leave a comment

Do you think you ever make things more difficult than they really are? I think we often do that with God. We make him to be something we can never know or understand and yet it Jeremiah 9:24 the Bible says to boast only in knowing and understanding God. How awesome is that?! Yet, still we humans sure do a great job of making God’s power seem too weak to help us to be nice to someone or to actually read our Bible. Check out this short video clip that point out how dumb we look when we think obeying God is too difficult.